Swift/iOS AP Computer Science Principles

Make School is currently in the process of creating a free curriculum for next year’s AP Computer Science Principles course that teaches iPhone Development. We’ve named the course “Swift CSP.” Swift CSP is project-based, exploratory, and makes use of Swift Playgrounds to teach core CS concepts in a visual, gamified way.
  • We’ll cover the Seven “Big Ideas” through videos from our Make School Speaker Series. We’re leveraging our partners and contacts here in Silicon Valley to create content that students will find interesting and relevant. We currently have verbal commitments from people such as Head of Photography at Pixar, Craig Newmark (of Craigslist), and the UN’s Director of VR Filmmaking.
  • By the end of the course, your students will have made a great mobile app for submission to College Board that is also ready to be submitted to the App Store! We’ve found students get very excited about iOS development–high schoolers love the idea of creating an iPhone app that their peers can download and use. This content will make it easy for teachers to recruit students to AP CSP–especially female students, and underserved minorities.
  • We’ll be providing teachers who use our curriculum with a pre-made curriculum map, unit plans, and lesson plans. We understand how much time paperwork takes up–our goal is to simplify this for our teachers, so that you can spend more time working with your students!
  • We’ll be running an optional 3-day teacher workshop over the summer in San Francisco, CA to train teachers on how best to use our curriculum.
There is no “freemium” content, etc. We want to help support high school CS teachers.
If you’re interested in using our curriculum or have any questions, you can contact our Swift CSP team (Nicolai Safai, Dion Larson and Mike Kane) at swiftcsp@makeschool.com.
Also, if you already have iOS experience, we’re hiring Summer iOS Instructors and we pay $16.5-20k for 11 weeks. Apply here: www.makeschool.com/jobs/ios-summer-instructor.

AP Summer Institutes [CSP]

Dear Educator,
As you may know, the Advanced Placement (AP) program’s Summer Institutes (APSIs — www.collegeboard.org/apsischolarships) offer intensive professional development programs where teachers can network with peers and learn about tools and resources that inspire success in their AP classrooms.
To support the launch of the new AP Computer Science Principles (CSP) course in fall 2016, the AP program is offering two different scholarships for teachers to attend an APSI in 2016.
Apply for these AP Computer Science Principles scholarship programs at www.collegeboard.org/cspscholarships by February 1, 2016.
The AP CSP scholarship covers the cost of tuition for an AP CSP Summer Institute for teachers of AP CSP in the 2016-17 academic year at schools where at least 51 percent of the student population consists of underrepresented minorities (African American, Hispanic/Latino, and/or Native American students) and/or at least 51 percent of the student population qualifies for free or reduced-price lunch.
The White House Initiative scholarship provides $1,000 toward AP Summer Institute tuition, travel, and expenses to AP CSP teachers in the 2016-17 academic year at schools where at least 51 percent of the student population consists of Hispanic/Latino students. AP is granting these scholarships as part of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics.
Please note that the scholarship funds can only be used toward an official AP Summer Institute; they cannot be used to fund AP Computer Science Principles professional development training offered by another organization.
We look forward to your applications,
The Advanced Placement program

San Diego CSTA Member Recognized as Top 100 Computer Science Educator

Art Lopez, a member of CCST’s California Teacher Advisory Council (Cal TAC), was selected by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Center for Women & Information Technology as one of the top 100 computer science educators in the US, and participated in a workshop to help launch Computer Science Education Week in Washington, D.C. on December 8 and 9.

“The event focused on the value of computer science education & curriculum for our children in public education,” said Lopez, who teaches computer science at Sweetwater High School in San Diego County. “The speeches were inspiring, and emphasized how important computing and computational thinking are for all children to learn.”

Speakers at the event included NSF Director and former CCST Council member France A. Córdova, along with John Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology, Megan Smith, U.S. Chief Technology Officer, and Hadi Partovi, founder and CEO of the nonprofit organization Code.org, which works to expand participation in computer science.

The NSF has been working for years to broaden the participation of individuals in all fields of STEM, including computer science; since 2008 NSF has funded researchers to develop new curricula, with the initial goal of training 10,000 teachers to teach computer science in 10,000 schools across the nation. More recently NSF’s partners have agreed to expand this goal to include all U.S. schools.

“We must discover and deploy new methods of recruitment and retention to ensure that all students in schools across the country have access to the most advanced learning environments,” said Córdova at the workshop.

 

Art Lopez videolopez250

Lopez was one of the educators invited by the NSF to speak about the importance of computer science in a video prepared for Computer Science Education week.
Art Lopez has long been an advocate of integrating computer science education as an integral component and requirement for students’ education at the elementary, middle school, high school, and postsecondary levels. He is currently one of the 50 nationally selected pilot instructors for the College Board’s proposed Advance Placement “Computer Science Principles” course, and is also currently working with the CE21/ComPASS group of San Diego County, including UCSD, SDSU, and the San Diego Super Computer Center.

“It was a great opportunity to connect with leaders and tell them about Cal TAC’s mission and what we are working to accomplish for STEM education in the state of California,” said Lopez. “We certainly have many challenges that we need to meet, but the dedication and passion of my colleagues really inspires and impacts students’ lives, and makes Cal TAC a special place to work for.”